Cookies on this website
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. If you click 'Continue' we'll assume that you are happy to receive all cookies and you won't see this message again. Click 'Find out more' for information on how to change your cookie settings.

The Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology is an international centre of excellence focusing on understanding the causes of chronic inflammatory conditions to develop new treatments that change lives.

The Kennedy Institute was formed in 1965 as the Mathilda and Terence Kennedy Institute of Rheumatology, in London. In 2011, the Institute joined the University of Oxford as an independent constituent Institute within the Nuffield Department of Orthopaedics, Rheumatology and Musculoskeletal Science (NDORMS).

The Institute houses basic and clinical scientists working together in the areas of microbiome, immunology, inflammation and tissue biology and repair. We adopt a multidisciplinary approach, from basic biology, through models of disease to the development and testing of novel therapies in the clinic.

We host the Centre for Osteoarthritis Pathogenesis, a centre of excellence funded by Arthritis Research UK, the University of Oxford and the Kennedy Trust for Rheumatology Research (KTRR), which aims to develop novel disease “markers” and therapies for patients with osteoarthritis.

We are located in our own purpose designed building at the heart of the University of Oxford's Old Road campus, a premier site for translational research in Oxford. We enjoy close ties with other research centres on campus and throughout the University as well as nearby research hospitals such as the Nuffield Orthopaedic Centre and the John Radcliffe.

The Kennedy Institute is historically linked to the Kennedy Trust for Rheumatology Research (KTRR), but also receives funding from numerous sources including Arthritis Research UK, The Wellcome Trust, the Research Councils, the European Commission and a variety of smaller charities.

The Institute Director is Professor Fiona Powrie FRS.